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Diabetic foot

close up of women feet with swelling
Diabetic Foot is a common complication of diabetes that affects the feet. People with diabetes are at increased risk for foot problems due to nerve damage and poor blood flow, which can result in decreased sensation, slower healing, and increased risk of infection.

Causes of Diabetic Foot

Diabetic Foot is caused by the combination of nerve damage and poor blood flow that occur in people with diabetes. Other risk factors include:

  1. Poorly controlled blood sugar levels
  2. Smoking
  3. Poor foot care and hygiene
  4. Foot injuries or deformities

Symptoms of Diabetic Foot

The symptoms of diabetic foot can vary, but may include:

  1. Numbness or tingling in the feet
  2. Pain or burning sensations in the feet
  3. Sores or cuts that do not heal
  4. Swelling in the feet or ankles
  5. Foot ulcers
  6. Dry, cracked skin

Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetic Foot

Diabetic Foot is typically diagnosed through a physical examination and medical history review. Treatment for diabetic foot may include:

  1. Foot care: Regular foot care, including daily washing and moisturizing, and avoiding going barefoot can help prevent foot problems in people with diabetes.

  2. Proper footwear: Wearing properly fitting shoes and socks can help prevent foot injuries and sores.

  3. Blood sugar control: Keeping blood sugar levels within the target range can help improve nerve function and blood flow to the feet.

  4. Wound care: Proper wound care, including the use of dressings and antibiotics, can help prevent infections and promote healing.

  5. Offloading: Wearing special shoes or inserts can help distribute weight evenly and reduce pressure on the feet.

With proper care, most people with diabetic foot can prevent complications and maintain good foot health. Regular foot exams and appointments with a healthcare provider are important to monitor foot health and address any concerns or questions you may have.

Living with Diabetic Foot

Diabetic Foot is a serious complication of diabetes, but with proper care, most people with this condition can prevent complications and maintain good foot health. It is important to work closely with a healthcare provider to ensure the best possible outcome, and to address any concerns or questions you may have about living with diabetic foot.